Greenacres

Farm

Generative Since 1949

Mr. Nippert, a Greenacres founder, recognized that years of growing grain had depleted the soil, and set out to convert the farm from a grain operation to a cattle farm, believing that cattle and other livestock would naturally fertilize the pastures. His theory paid off, as Greenacres is now covered in lush green pastures and healthy, living soil created through multi-species grazing.

Agriculture

Department

Livestock Production

We raise a variety of animals using humane and low-stress handling techniques. Grass-finished Black Angus cattle and lamb, woodland raised pork, and a mixture of pastured poultry. We limit the use of antibiotics and avoid using pesticides or herbicides where animals will be grazing. Pasture rotation is strictly managed to help keep both animals and land healthy.

Department

Vegetable Production

Holistically and sustainably we grow a variety of vegetables that are exceptional in quality and ability to nourish. You can sample and purchase them at the Greenacres Farm Store or when we are at various farmer’s markets. They are free of chemical fertilizers and pesticides because of our growing methods like crop rotation, cover crops, and a living soil approach.

Department

Greenhouse Production

The greenhouse raises the majority of the plant materials needed by other departments. They work closely with the landscaping and events teams to provide over 5,000 annuals for the seasonal plantings and events around Greenacres. The vegetable production team relies on them to assist with vegetable seed propagation, as well as oversee the micro-greens program.

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The beautiful summer annuals planted in our Arts Center gardens are grown from seed to bloom all on site! Check out our selection of these annuals at the farm store to add to your own gardens and landscape! đŸŒ± ...

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Taking deep soil samples for carbon analysis allows us to see how much carbon is being pulled and locked into pasture soils. This helps us measure the effectiveness of our strategic grazing practices and gives us a better understanding of the health of our pastures. Healthy soils are capable of holding a tremendous amount of carbon and can help reduce the concentration of atmospheric carbon! ...

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Our Research Department is working with the University of Tennessee to study the effects of different nutrient and pH levels and on pasture grass germination and development. The findings can be used to influence and improve future pasture management. ...

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A minute of zen brought to you from our Ley field. This cover crop of rye, winter peas and red clover is beautiful, but more importantly it protects and improves the soil between rotations of vegetable crops and grazing animals. The peas (like all legumes) pull nitrogen out of the atmosphere and, through a symbiotic relationship with soil bacteria, makes it available for other plants to use in the soil. Nitrogen is one of the critical elements of soil fertility, setting up our crops for success! ...

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