Category: Featured

11 May 2022
pond with tall grasses

Spring 2022 Update

wetland pond with tall grasses

Spring 2022

The Benefits of Multi-Species Grazing (Sheep and Cattle)

This past April, agricultural team members, Michael Cox and Leevi Stump, traveled to Iowa and purchased 50 new ewes. Over the coming months, the new sheep will be integrated with our cattle herd. We are extremely excited about this multi-species grazing approach. Grazing different species together allows for better pasture utilization and can even help decrease undesired plant populations. 

Sheep and cows are selective grazers, but each in a different manner. Sheep enjoy woody shrubs and bushes, while the cattle prefer the lush grass which makes for complete, even grazing of our pastures. When the animals graze together, it also helps deter large predators, like coyotes, from attacking the more vulnerable sheep. Our Agriculture Director, Michael Cox, also tells us that, “the combination of two different species in one pasture can help balance the parasite burden for the animals”.  And, since the two animals have different harvest times, this means we will have a steady meat supply in the farm store!

six sheep and one bull in grass field

“The combination of two different species in one pasture can help balance the parasite burden for the animals.

-Michael Cox, Agriculture Director

Michaela Farm

In addition to hosting a handful of school field trips and clean-up events, Greenacres’ Michaela Farm is having an active gardening season this spring!  We are currently working on a plan that would expand the farm’s production to meet educational needs at this location and better serve our customers. This is an ongoing project that will be coming together over the next few months. If you are in Oldenburg, Indiana and find yourself at Michaela Farm, make sure to stop by the farm store! We currently have fresh produce, eggs, and a wide selection of vegetable, flower, and herb start transplants for your home gardens.

Fresh Finds at the Farm Store

Just in time for our annual Mother’s Day weekend plant sale, our Garden Crew helped to beautify the Greenacres storefront by planting wildlife-attracting landscaping. The team hopes to add additional native and seasonal landscaping throughout the Greenacres properties. Our farm store continues to be filled with beautiful flower bouquets and arrangements, which are available throughout the year. Lilies, ranunculus, anemone and bachelor’s buttons mixed with other seasonal beauties are currently available until the summertime zinnias and sunflowers come along. Our produce selection continues to expand with the warmer weather – we have a large variety of fresh herbs, beets are back, and our customers have been enjoying the asparagus provided by Michaela Farm. As we ramp up for the summer season, keep an eye on our email newsletter and the website to know when your favorite summer veggies come into the Farm Store!

bouquet of flowers

Come See Our Newest Classroom at Lewis Township!

Construction is officially complete for our education facility in Lewis Township! As part of our efforts to be green, we made sure to equip this building with an abundance of green features. A geothermal energy system was installed for heating and cooling. Since the geothermal system only requires electricity to run the heat pump and blower motor, it uses significantly less power and produces fewer carbon emissions than a conventional system (e.g. gas, oil, electric). 

The facility also contains automated solar tubes (or sun tunnels) designed to bring external light into the building. Our Buildings and Grounds Director, Alex Saurber tells us, “by using the sun’s natural light, we are able to reduce the amount of electricity needed to illuminate the building.” He also adds that, “the amount of light that is let in can be adjusted to accommodate for various activities throughout the day.” We are thrilled this new classroom is up and running, and look forward to hosting more field trips and events at this location soon!

 “By using the sun’s natural light, we are able to reduce the amount of electricity needed to illuminate the building. The amount of light that is let in can be adjusted to accommodate for various activities throughout the day.”

-Alex Saurber, Buildings and Grounds Director

tall grasses and wildflowers in front of pond and educational facility

Greenacres Events Coming Soon

Our events team is looking forward to a full calendar of weddings this year but these ceremonies and receptions are not the only events on the radar! On Friday July 8, 2022, we will be hosting the annual Music Under the Stars. The Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra’s Poptet will be putting on a groovy performance of 70’s favorites at the Arts Center, in the beautiful gardens.

The following week, on Saturday July 16, 2022 Greenacres is organizing a fundraiser, An Evening of Hope for Ukraine.  This event supports humanitarian aid efforts benefitting the people of Ukraine. 100% of the proceeds will be donated to Matthew 25: Ministries and will be used exclusively for humanitarian efforts benefitting the people of Ukraine.

Events Director, Kyle Conlon reminds us, “These events sell out quickly! Make sure to follow us on social media and subscribe to our email newsletter to be the first to know when tickets go on sale.”

fountain and trees

These events sell out quickly! Make sure to follow us on social media and subscribe to our email newsletter to be the first to know when tickets go on sale.

-Kyle Conlon, Events Director

Music in the Meadow

On Thursday August 4, 2022, we will be celebrating the official opening of Greenacres Lewis Township with the Cincinnati Pops Orchestra. John Morris Russell will lead the Pops in the 90-minute concert performing “A Night at the Movies”. The set list will feature music from some of your favorite films. This event is open to the public and a great opportunity to learn about Greenacres and our plans for the property. This is a free event, but we ask that all guests RSVP for planning purposes.

Watching Life Grow at Greenacres

Spring is the season of new life and growth and what better place than Greenacres to witness this? Our education department has enjoyed having school field trips organized throughout the Greenacres properties while students return to in-person field trips. Our administrative coordinator, Katie Brown, tells us, “All around the farm, students can learn about and observe first-hand the various phases of animal and plant life cycles. Greenacres is a perfect place to see all the new animal babies in the spring!” From an abundance of tadpoles in our ponds, to the young calves in our pasture, and all of the macroinvertebrates in between, there is so much growing life to observe at Greenacres! 

If you are an educator interested in field trips, please contact our Education Coordinator Katie Brown. Our Education Team creates exceptional field trip experiences for each and every visitor we serve. We collaborate with classroom educators to build customized, hands-on interactive experiences aligned with grade-level academic learning standards. You can use our field trip programming tool to browse popular topics by grade and by academic subject.

group of four children and two adults walking in grass field

“All around the farm, students can learn about and observe first-hand the various phases of animal and plant life cycles. Greenacres is a perfect place to see all the new animal babies in the spring!”

-Katie Brown, Administrative Coordinator

Spring Equine Lessons

Our Equine department’s 13-week Spring Session is coming to close and we are looking forward to the 2022 Equine Summer Camps! We welcomed 21 new riders off of the waitlist and had a total of 65 students enrolled in the lesson program this Spring. The Greenacres Pony Club Riding Center members have been busy attending horse shows this Spring. All of the horse and rider pairs competing this Spring have finished within the top 8 in their divisions. Our Equine Manager, Becca North tells us, “we still have an active waitlist, so if you are interested in enrolling in the lesson program we invite you to join the waitlist through the equine page on the Greenacres website.”

We still have an active waitlist, so if you are interested in enrolling in the lesson program we invite you to join the waitlist through the equine page on the Greenacres website.

-Becca North, Equine Manager

What does Healthy Soil Look Like?

Every Spring, our Research department spends several weeks monitoring our pastures and woodlands. This helps ensure that all of our ecosystems are healthy and functioning correctly. This Spring, the team completed some essential assessments, including vegetation surveys, litter surveys, soil sampling, and faunal sampling. When conducting faunal sampling, our researchers look for animal life using pitfall traps and “herp circles”. 

The pitfall traps are used to survey arthropod communities (small macroinvertebrates such as springtails, millipedes and spiders) while the  “herp circles” (15-meter diameter circles) help us look for reptiles and amphibians. The arthropod community’s composition gives us insight into litter decomposition, nutrient cycling, and overall ecosystem functioning. Research Assistant Chad Gibson tells us, “Searching for reptiles, and especially amphibians can help interpret ecosystem health due to their extreme sensitivity to pollutants and disturbance.” With continued monitoring, we can notice changes in faunal populations and make more informed decisions when it comes to our land management.

long tailed salamander on log

“Searching for reptiles, and especially amphibians can help interpret ecosystem health due to their extreme sensitivity to pollutants and disturbance.”

-Chad Gibson, Research Assistant 

21 Mar 2022

Greenacres & Ukraine: Finding Friendship in Farming

Greenacres & Ukraine: Finding Friendship in Farming

As the tragic events unfold across Ukraine, Cincinnatians have been reminded of the special relationship and stories Cincinnati’s local organizations have with the people of Ukraine. One lesser known story is how a local non-profit’s education programs played a role in helping Ukraine develop into a world leader in agriculture.

In the early 2000’s, the United States State Department brought Ukrainian farmers to the US on a multi-state tour to learn about various agricultural practices around the country. The State Department approached Greenacres Foundation, a Cincinnati based non-profit and working farm, about hosting the Ukrainian visitors so they could learn about generative agricultural practices.

Ukrainian farmers in the Greenacres pasture working with a translator.

“The Nipperts instilled into our core values that we are to be good-neighbors and show grace, so naturally we were delighted with the opportunity to host these farmers who were just starting to understand what real freedom meant to their future.” said Carter Randolph, President of Greenacres Foundation. “We showed them how we farm, the equipment we use, and how they could take our practices back with them. At the end of the visit, we enjoyed a traditional Ukrainian meal and exchanged cultural drink traditions. Frozen vodka was used for toasts and Budweiser™ beer was served as an American beer experience. It was during these toasts we learned about their struggles under the USSR and their hope for a prosperous future. They knew some of this would be achieved through farming and they were very impressed by the practices used at Greenacres. Even though they visited much larger operations around the country, the industrialized nature of those farms were not a good fit for them. Not only do they rely on large, expensive, equipment which put them out of reach of the average farmer, but Greenacres’ willingness to put the quality of the land and soil first spoke volumes to farmers from a country known for their extremely fertile soil. A friendship was made and a language barrier broken because of our mutual love of farming. “Greenacres will stand with Ukraine” continued Randolph.

Ukrainian visitors pointing out their home towns on a map.

“We showed them how we farm, the equipment we use, and how they could take our practices back with them. At the end of the visit, we enjoyed a traditional Ukrainian meal and exchanged cultural drink traditions.

-Carter Randolph, Greenacres President

The trip to Greenacres made quite an impression on the visitors and in -following years the State Department reached out about hosting more Ukrainian visitors who specifically asked to stop at Greenacres as they had heard about how wonderful it was from their friends.

To honor the memory of these visits and the people who love our city and our way of life, The Louis and Louise Nippert Charitable Foundation (L&L Nippert Charitable Foundation) has made a grant of $250,000 to Mathew 25: Ministries to aid in the Ukraine humanitarian effort. The L&L Nippert Charitable Foundation is a grant making foundation and part of the trio of Nippert legacy foundations that include Greenacres Foundation and Louise Dieterle Nippert Musical Arts Fund.

Members of Greenacres and visiting Ukrainian farmers share a shot of Ukrainian vodka while exchanging drink traditions.

“We are so very appreciative of the incredibly generous support provided by the L&L Nippert Charitable Foundation for our Ukraine Relief work. Matthew 25: Ministries is shipping relief supplies to people in Ukraine and those who have fled to the surrounding countries.

-Tim Mettey, CEO Matthew 25: Ministries

“We are so very appreciative of the incredibly generous support provided by the L&L Nippert Charitable Foundation for our Ukraine Relief work. Matthew 25: Ministries is shipping relief supplies to people in Ukraine and those who have fled to the surrounding countries. The support will help provide desperately-needed aid to people affected by this crisis, helping to care for them and provide the assurance that they are not forgotten. Thank you for so generously supporting our work during this time of such urgent need. We will be helping in the affected region for a long time to come, and your partnership will help make continued relief efforts possible.”  Said Tim Mettey, CEO Matthew 25: Ministries

The farmers at Greenacres will be planting sunflowers around their properties to show support for Ukraine and visitors to the Greenacres Farm Store will have the opportunity to round up transactions as a way to donate to these humanitarian causes

ABOUT GREENACRES FOUNDATION: Greenacres Foundation was founded in 1988 and was Louis and Louise Nippert’s gift to the community. Combining their love of the land and farming with their appreciation of Cincinnati’s classical arts, Greenacres provides educational programming to over 30,000 local students annually while preserving and generatively farming over 1,200 acres in the Greater Cincinnati area. For more information please contact Greenacres at (513) 891-4227 or mail@green-acres.org.

ABOUT MATTHEW 25: MINISTRIES: Matthew 25: Ministries rescues and reuses over 15,000,000 pounds of products each year and redistributes them to the poorest of the poor and disaster victims. Each year, Matthew 25: Ministries impacts the lives of more than 20,000,000 individuals throughout the United States and around the world.  Matthew 25 is ranked on Forbes’ 2021 list of the Largest U.S. Charities. Matthew 25 is also highly ranked among more than 3,700 four-star charities on Charity Navigator. Matthew 25: Ministries is accredited by the Better Business Bureau through the “Wise Giving Alliance Standards.” For more information, or to schedule an interview, contact Michelle Jones mjones@m25m.org at Matthew 25: Ministries (513) 793-6256, or visit www.m25m.org.

07 Dec 2021

$19 Million Research Project Seeks to Understand How Management Impacts Soil Health, Farmer Well-Being

$19 Million Research Project Seeks to Understand How Management Impacts Soil Health, Farmer Well-Being

For original article, click here

MYRTLE BEACH, SC – An international coalition announced a $19 million research project aimed at understanding how a farmer or rancher’s grazing management decisions impact soil health on pasture and rangeland (commonly called grazing lands) and – in turn – how soil health can positively impact a producer’s land and well-being.

Entitled Metrics, Management, and Monitoring: An Investigation of Pasture and Rangeland Soil Health and its Drivers, the project was announced today at the National Grazing Lands Coalition triennial meeting. The Foundation for Food & Agriculture Research awarded Noble Research Institute a $9.5 million grant to lead this critical research that is improving soil health on grazing lands. Noble Research Institute is providing $7.5 million to this project with additional financial contributions by Greenacres Foundation, The Jones Family Foundation and ButcherBox.

Pasture and rangeland soils contain about 20 percent of the world’s soil organic carbon stock but have largely deteriorated in many regions due to poor management, fragmentation or conversion to cropland. As soil health decreases, the land loses its viability to grow healthy plants, maintain flood- and drought-resilience or filter water.

For decades, farmers and ranchers who have implemented soil health principles have improved the overall health of their land and have experienced more profitable operations, however, these observations have – to this point – been largely anecdotal. This research is quantifying these observations and examining how management decisions on grazing lands are connected to the overall health of the ecosystem, including the social and economic well-being of the farmer, rancher and land manager.

“Enhancing soil resilience and productivity necessitates a major investment in research that provides farmers and ranchers with the best tools and information to make informed decisions benefitting their operations, said FFAR Executive Director Dr. Sally Rockey. “FFAR is proud to fund this audacious research that supports thriving farms and ranches while improving overall environmental health for the betterment of society.”

The project brings together researchers from 11 nonprofit organizations, for-profit businesses, private research institutes and public universities in the United States and the United Kingdom. Led by Noble Research Institute, Michigan State University, Colorado State University and the University of Wyoming, collaborators include Oregon State University, National Grazing Lands Coalition, USDA-ARS (Maryland, Colorado and Wyoming), Savory Institute, Snaplands LLC,  The Nature Conservancy and  the UK’s Quanterra Systems.

The project will provide farmers and ranchers tools that simply and accurately measure outcomes of soil health in grazing land environments to guide management decisions and quantify the impact of intentional management. Measuring soil health requires techniques that are often site-specific and costly for ranchers.

“Our focus is to develop strategies to increase the value of measurement, reduce the labor and cost of measurement, and increase our understanding of soil health beyond a single site to the ranch as a whole,” said Rhines president and CEO of Noble Research Institute. “This information – in conjunction with working directly with land managers – will help us better understand the drivers that inform producers to adopt and implement soil health-focused management practices.

The study is unique in that it will focus on the soil health of grazing lands. Most soil health initiatives explore cropland, failing to address the hundreds of millions of acres of degrading pasture and rangeland. These acres are best suited for livestock production and are incapable of sustained production of crops for human food.

Pasture and rangelands are among the largest ecosystems on the planet, covering 70 percent of the world agricultural area. There are 655 million acres of pasture and rangeland in the United States. This is 41 percent of the land usage in the continental United States, making it the single largest use of land in the nation – more than row crops, cities and timberlands.

“Improving the ecological management of these hundreds of millions of acres, farmers and ranchers can be catalysts for sequestering carbon, better managing fresh water, reducing typical greenhouse gas emissions and building soil health, which all benefit society at large,” said Dr. Jason Rowntree, professor of Sustainable Agriculture at Michigan State University and project co-lead. “In addition, applying these core agricultural principles also helps producers be more sustainable and profitable, ensuring they can leave a legacy of healthy land and brighter futures for their children. It’s a win-win.”

The project is exploring why some producers adopt soil health building principles, such as adaptive grazing management, while others do not. It is also examining social and economic sustainability (commonly called producer well-being), which have rarely been studied in agriculture, or in particular, livestock agriculture. Anecdotally, producers report that their profitability and/or quality of life improve when they adaptively manage their assets, including the soil, plants and grazing animals, according to Rowntree.

MEDIA INQUIRIES:

Colleen Klemczewski
Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research
Phone: 574.386.0658
Email: cklemczewski@foundationfar.org

Adam Calaway
Noble Research Institute
Phone: 580-224-6209
Email: jacalaway@noble.org

28 Sep 2021

Summer 2021 Update

Summer 2021 Update

Pasture Monitoring

Monitoring plays a large role in the research department.  In addition to monitoring the woodlands, we also monitor the pastures.  Collecting data on soil health and vegetation can inform management decisions made by the livestock team.  Data collected include comprehensive soil tests (encompassing the physical, chemical and biological components of soil), water infiltration and compaction.   Plant species diversity is measured along with an overall assessment of ecosystem health.  Finally, photos document the visual features of the pasture.  Continuous improvement in soil health and desired pasture species is the goal. The photo below visually shows the improvement in vegetative cover, species richness and desired species over 3 years.  This land was a former soybean field in Brown County and is now a native warm season pasture.  We recently developed a comprehensive monitoring schedule for all of our pastures.

Use the image slider to see the 3 year change.

Preserving a Piece of History

Built in mid to late 1920’s as part of the original architecture of the stable facilities, the grain silos at our equine center are an iconic piece of scenery for visitors to the Greenacres Arts Center and Riding Facility. During an annual inspection by our Buildings & Grounds team in June, a number of age related issues affecting the safety of the structures were discovered. “These buildings are in remarkably good shape given their age, however, we did find that certain components were starting to show their age which is nearly 100 years of service. The design, craftsmanship and method of construction was lightyears ahead of their time” says Alex Saurber, Director of Buildings and Grounds. “Our goal is to make sure these buildings continue to withstand the test of time while preserving their historic look. By making these improvements they will remain a unique site for our visitors”.

After careful review and planning, work began in August to restore and replace these critical components. These repairs are expected to be completed before the end of November 2021.

Expanding Flower Production

Flower production on our farm started small in 2019, as a pilot project by Sam Dunbar, Aesthetic Garden Coordinator, when she was a farm intern. Now in her second full season of production, our flower program has grown by leaps and bounds. At Greenacres, we seek to encourage biodiversity, grow organically, and provide quality experiences for our guests – flowers bring together these fundamental tenants of our farm in the most beautiful way. “Most of our vegetable crops rely on pollinators to produce fruit, and interplanting flowers among the vegetables is one of the best ways to encourage pollinators to visit.” says Dunbar, “We plant more flowers than we will harvest, ensuring there’s plenty left for our pollinators to enjoy. Honeybees from our onsite hives are a common sight, busily working away.”

We also plant flowers of different shapes – round, trumpet, umbel shape, etc., encouraging many different kinds of pollinators to visit and build biodiversity. Each species of insect searching for nectar or pollen is seeking a flower shape that suits its specific anatomy and preferences. Hummingbirds like trumpet shapes, bees like round shapes, and wasps prefer umbel shapes. These specific preferences are something our education staff can share with students who visit our gardens.

As with everything in our gardens, our flowers are grown without the use of pesticides, herbicides, or non-organic fertilizers. Flowers from a florist or grocery store may be grown using a wide array of chemical inputs, most of which are detrimental to our environment and pollinators. They’re also typically grown on farms far away and transported thousands of miles to their final destination. Seeking out local flowers can sometimes require a bit more effort, but are well worth the benefits. Customers take home gorgeous flower bouquets while our pollinators and gardens benefit from the increased plant diversity. We’re looking forward to refining and expanding flower production as we enter our third growing season!

“Most of our vegetable crops rely on pollinators to produce fruit, and interplanting flowers among the vegetables is one of the best ways to encourage pollinators to visit.

-Sam Dunbar, Aesthetic Garden Coordinator

The Magic of Summer Camps

Our 2021 summer season revealed the true magic that camp brings. It seemed even nature itself cheered when little boots, water bottles and tie dye shirts arrived in June! Once Upon a Camp, Fun on the Farm, Nurture Nature, Arts in the Natural World, Gone Fishin’… all camps sold quickly and the waiting lists filled up.

Education Administrative Coordinator, Katie Brown explained, “After the 2020 pause, the heightened interest in Greenacres Summer Camps became clear. Even so, we did commit to maintaining small groups with an average of one Greenacres Educator to five children, putting the safety of our families first.”

With camps returning, it was a great opportunity for local high schoolers to once again build their leadership skills over the summer. 31 local high-school student volunteers for the Greenacres Leaders-in-Training (LIT) Program. Under the guidance of the same Greenacres Educators that host thousands of children for field trips each school year, our LITs learned valuable skills on how to safely run a camps, helping ensure that over 290 children enjoyed a safe and magical summer.

“After the 2020 season pause, the heightened interest in Greenacres Summer Camp became clear. Even so, we did commit to maintaining small groups with an average of one Greenacres Educator to five children, putting the safety of our families first.”

-Katie Brown, Education Administrative Coordinator

Camp magic continues with the release of the 2022 guide before the end of the year and registration to open in early 2022 on our website, https://www.green-acres.org/camps/ .

A Roost for Turkeys

Our livestock team is always looking for ways to increase the quality of life for the animals we raise at Greenacres. Whether it’s shade structures for our cattle or improved chicken tractors for our broilers, no detail large or small is over looked in the process. Even though turkeys are only on our farm for a short period of time, we treat them with the same care and respect that we give to all of our animals.

Every year after Thanksgiving, our team sits down and reviews what they can do to improve our ability to raise turkeys. “Our turkeys have always had access to clean water, fresh pastures, and the safety of our poultry tractors, but we were overlooking their natural instinct to want to roost” says our Livestock Manager, Leevi Stump.  “We looked at our options and decided we could come up with a solution to this challenge before we brought turkeys back onto the farm”. Working with the some of the master welders on our estate crew, a roosting system was designed and construction began in (June?). The build went smoothly and the roosts went out into the field in August waiting for our turkeys to get big enough to use them over the fall.  “We think these will go a long ways to making our turkeys more comfortable” says Stump, “it helps protect them from ground predators and lets them exercise that natural instinct to be in trees”.

“Our turkeys have always had access to clean water, fresh pastures, and the safety of our poultry tractors, but we were overlooking their natural instinct to want to roost.

-Livestock person, Livestock person

A Pollinator Garden for the Farm Store

We’ve enjoyed seeing all of you in the Farm Store this summer. The most noticeable change is our new pollinator garden. In late winter, spring, and early summer of this year, a thick, black tarp was covering the landscaping in front of the store. This tarp prevented the growth of the plants underneath, which had become overgrown. The heat and moisture trapped by the tarp also acts to supercharge the biological activity in the soil, helping the microbes break down the decaying plant material underneath, in a process known as ‘solarization’.

When we removed the tarp in early summer, the soil was beautiful and much improved. A layer of our own compost was added, and a thick layer of natural wood chip mulch to retain moisture and suppress weeds. We’ve intermixed native and ornamental perennials and annuals, to provide year-long flowers for the visiting pollinators. Some of the species we’ve planted are also host plants for caterpillars, such as butterfly weed, a type of milkweed that serves as a host plant for Monarch butterfly caterpillars. Over the next few years we will be adding additional perennial species, and mixing in different annuals to see what produces the most beautiful results. We are very grateful to our garden crew for providing such a beautiful and beneficial garden to enjoy.

Summertime Music

Our friends from the Cincinnati Pops Orchestra returned this summer for another great series of “Music Under the Stars” events.. The sellout crowds enjoyed beautiful evenings in July and August listening to members of the Pops play summertime favorites in the gardens at the Arts Center. Late in the summer the entire Cincinnati Pops, and members from the Cincinnati Opera, Cincinnati May Festival, and Cincinnati Ballet, returned for our annual Celebration Concert in the Grand Tent. It was an amazing performance and a perfect cap to end summer.

Between our concerts, we hosted nine weddings from June through September. “We were thrilled to host a full slate of weddings this season after so many couples had to postpone their 2020 wedding dates. We know that was a really tough decision for them, so it was nice to finally see them get to have the event of their dreams.” says Diana Wheeler, Private Events Manager.

“We were thrilled to host a full slate of weddings this season after so many couples had to postpone their 2020 wedding dates.

-Diana Wheeler, Private Events Manager

Ohio Native Warm Season Grass Trials

This past summer our Lewis Township site became one of four test sites in Ohio for establishing native warm season grasses under various management regimes. This three year experiment is being coordinated through the Ohio State University under the direction of Dr. Marília Chiavegato. Three different establishment protocols were used representing both conventional and non-chemical management strategies. Big bluestem, Indian grass, eastern gamma grass and switchgrass were planted and their growth and development will be documented. Increased pasture diversity in Ohio is important for ecosystem resilience under a changing climate. “Doing collaborative research with external institutions is extremely important as it allows Greenacres to develop relationships with scientists and experts in fields that support our mission. At the same time it allows Greenacres to share their expertise and promote research and knowledge to a much larger community,” says Research Director Chad Bitler.

The research team collecting data in treatments sown in cover crop.

“Doing collaborative research with external institutions is extremely important as it allows Greenacres to develop relationships with scientists and experts in fields that support our mission. At the same time it allows Greenacres to share their expertise and promote research and knowledge to a much larger community

-Chad Bitler, Research Director